Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island focus – families

The greatest support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children can get for their early development is from their parents and aunties and uncles. There are many great resources available to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families with their children.

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Support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Families

The future of our communities and our nation depends on providing children with good quality learning. When children are young, the most robust and beneficial learning occurs in natural contexts, with loving caregivers, and involves games.

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Reading to your child—fun and vital for development

Finding the time to read with your child is a fun and valuable way to bond and is a crucial investment in their future. 

Reading is one of the most important foundations for success in school and in life. Studies show that reading to children daily can add up to a year to their intellectual development.

When you read to them, children experience the joy of storytelling and learn how books can teach and entertain. You are also helping their brains to develop. 

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How to create a nurturing home environment for learning

'How much will this baby change how we live our lives?’ wonder many expectant parents. ‘Enormously’ is the only true answer—but there is much guidance on what parents need to do to create the most nurturing home environment for their developing child.

Young babies, toddlers and preschoolers are like adults in many ways. They swing between established routines and patterns of behaviours to exactly the opposite.

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Smiling is learning: Connecting with babies

It’s truly marvellous when we think about how vulnerable newborn babies are to also realise how actively they are learning from the moment they’re born. And the key to how they learn is all about the quality of the relationship and connection they have with their first primary care givers.

The importance of this connection can be seen, for example, when premature babies are nursed on their parents’ chests, skin to skin. They do better physically and go home from hospital sooner; they also do better at school than the infants who are cared for without this level of direct contact. Making relationships with babies—connecting with them—is the foundation for every part of their development: social development, brain development, health and education.

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